Important Safety Information Prescribing Information This website is intended for US residents only.
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SANCUSO® (granisetron transdermal system) prescribing information

When to consider SANCUSO

Are your patients on chemotherapy experiencing diseases or treatment-related complications that make it difficult to take or retain oral antiemetics?

Cancer type

Head and neck cancer7

Chemoradiation icon
Chemoradiationb
Chemotherapy icon
Chemotherapy
  • Platinum-based (cisplatin, carboplatin)
  • Microtubule inhibitor (paclitaxel)
  • Antimetabolite (5-FU)

Breast cancer8

Chemotherapy icon
Chemotherapy
  • Platinum-based (cisplatin, carboplatin)
  • Microtubule inhibitor (paclitaxel)
  • Antimetabolite (5-FU)

Lung cancer9

Chemoradiation icon
Chemoradiationb
Chemotherapy icon
Chemotherapy
  • Platinum-based (cisplatin, carboplatin)

Gastrointestinal cancer10

Chemoradiation icon
Chemoradiationb
Chemotherapy icon
Chemotherapy
  • Platinum-based (cisplatin, carboplatin)
  • Antimetabolite (5-FU)
  • Anthracycline (doxorubicin, epirubicin)

Gynecological cancer11,12

Chemoradiation icon
Chemoradiationb
Chemotherapy icon
Chemotherapy
  • Platinum-based (cisplatin, carboplatin)

Testicular cancer13

Chemoradiation icon
Chemoradiationb
Chemotherapy icon
Chemotherapy
  • Platinum-based (cisplatin, carboplatin)

Colorectal cancer14,15

Chemoradiation icon
Chemoradiationb
Chemotherapy icon
Chemotherapy
  • Platinum-based (cisplatin, carboplatin)
  • Microtubule inhibitor (paclitaxel) (5-FU)

Possible chemotherapy complicationsb

Difficulty swallowing is a possible complication of chemotherapy

Difficulty swallowing2
Learn more

Limited gut motility and absorption is a possible complication of chemotherapy

Limited gut motility/​absorption3
Learn more

An oncologist’s perspective

Play Video

Medical oncologist Allyson Ocean, MD, discusses preventing CINV in mechanically compromised patients.

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When to consider SANCUSO

Download

Download the flashcard to see when it might be appropriate to consider SANCUSO for your patients.

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Request a sample

You may have patients with chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) who are appropriate for SANCUSO. Request a sample at no cost to see if SANCUSO is the right option for your patients.

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Connect to stay informed

You may have patients with CINV who are ready for SANCUSO. Now you can receive updates about SANCUSO and learn about new resources as they become available.

Stay Informed
  1. Patients with cancer who are mechanically compromised include those with oral and/or gastrointestinal impairment associated with chemotherapy, with or without radiation, or tumor burden, who may be unable to take or retain oral antiemetics.2
  2. SANCUSO is not indicated for radiation-induced nausea and vomiting.1
Indication and Important Safety Information

Indication

SANCUSO® (granisetron transdermal system) is indicated for the prevention of nausea and vomiting in patients receiving moderately and/or highly emetogenic chemotherapy regimens of up to 5 consecutive days duration.

Important Safety Information

Contraindications

SANCUSO is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to granisetron or to any of the components of the patch.

Warnings and Precautions

Adverse Reactions

The most common adverse reaction in patients receiving SANCUSO is constipation (5.4%).

To report suspected adverse reactions, contact Kyowa Kirin, Inc. at 1-800-SANCUSO or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

See full Prescribing Information for SANCUSO.

References:
  1. SANCUSO [package insert]. Bridgewater, NJ: Kyowa Kirin, Inc.; 2013.
  2. Lalla RV, Bowen J, Barasch A, et al. MASCC/​ISOO clinical practice guidelines for the management of mucositis secondary to cancer therapy. Cancer. 2014;120(10):1453-1461. doi:10.1002/​cncr.28592.
  3. Keller J, Layer P. Intestinal and anorectal motility and functional disorders. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 2009;23(3):407-423. doi:10.1016/​j.bpg.2009.02.012.
  4. Schulmeister L. Granisetron transdermal system: a new option to help prevent chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2009;13(6):711-714. doi:10.1188/​09.CJON.711-714.
  5. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®): Antiemesis. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. https://​www.nccn.org/​professionals/​physician_gls/​pdf/​antiemesis.pdf. Updated July 20, 2011. Accessed December 18, 2019.
  6. Chemo brain. American Cancer Society website. http://​www.cancer.org/​treatment/​treatments-and-side-effects/​physical-side-effects/​changes-in-mood-or-thinking/​chemo-brain.html. Updated June 9, 2016. Accessed December 18, 2019.
  7. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®): Head and neck cancers. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. https://​www.nccn.org/​professionals/​physician_gls/​pdf/​head-and-neck.pdf. Updated May 30, 2014. Accessed December 18, 2019.
  8. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®): Breast cancer. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. https://​www.nccn.org/​professionals/​physician_gls/​pdf/​breast.pdf. Updated April 1, 2014. Accessed December 18, 2019.
  9. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®): Small cell lung cancer. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. https://​www.nccn.org/​professionals/​physician_gls/​pdf/​sclc.pdf. Updated June 18, 2014. Accessed December 18, 2019.
  10. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®): Gastric cancer. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. https://​www.nccn.org/​professionals/​physician_gls/​pdf/​gastric.pdf. Updated May 30, 2014. Accessed December 18, 2019.
  11. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®): Ovarian cancer: including fallopian tube caner and primary peritoneal cancer. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. https://​www.nccn.org/​professionals/​physician_gls/​pdf/​ovarian.pdf. Updated May 9, 2014. Accessed December 18, 2019.
  12. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®): Cervical cancer. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. https://​www.nccn.org/​professionals/​physician_gls/​pdf/​cervical.pdf. Updated August 7, 2014. Accessed December 18, 2019.
  13. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®): Testicular cancer. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. https://​www.nccn.org/​professionals/​physician_gls/​pdf/​testicular.pdf. December 13, 2013. Accessed December 18, 2019.
  14. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®): Colon cancer. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. https://​www.nccn.org/​professionals/​physician_gls/​pdf/​colon.pdf. Updated August 20, 2014. Accessed December 18, 2019.
  15. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®): Rectal cancer. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. https://​www.nccn.org/​professionals/​physician_gls/​pdf/​rectal.pdf. Updated August 20, 2014. Accessed December 18, 2019.
  16. Jensen SB, Pedersen AML, Vissink A, et al. A systematic review of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies: prevalence, severity and impact on quality of life. Support Care Cancer. 2010;18(8):1039-1060. doi:10.1007/​s00520-010-0827-8.
  17. Stacey R, Green JT. Radiation-induced small bowel disease: latest developments and clinical guidance. Ther Adv Chronic Dis. 2014;5(1):15-29. doi:10.1177/​2040622313510730.
  18. Ripamonti CI, Easson AM, Gerdes H. Management of malignant bowel obstruction. Eur J Cancer. 2008;44(8):1105-1115. doi:10.1016/​j.ejca.2008.02.028.